Protecting Libya’s Oil: The First Step to Stability

In partnership with the National Oil Corporation of Libya

Recent attempts to capture the Libyan oil sector, by armed militias and political factions alike, have highlighted the fragility of the country’s economy, and the urgent need to protect Libya’s energy resources in this period of transition.

The UN-backed Libyan Political Agreement, signed in December 2015,

was an important milestone to reaching a new political settlement in Libya. Nonetheless, political divisions remain and economically the country is failing, running big deficits while many families struggle to make a living. Indeed, from people smuggling to terrorism to the high rate of young men under arms, many of Libya’s headline problems are fundamentally driven by lack of economic opportunity. As the only remaining institution able to function across the country, it is more important than ever to maintain the integrity of Libya’s National Oil Corporation, and to work together to harness its potential in service of stabilisation and national regeneration.

We will explore in depth various ways to protect Libya’s oil sector, and to put it to work for the country as a whole, and for its people.

a cross in a box on a voting card

Learning for Democracy

In partnership with Democracy Matters

These are momentous times in global politics. The UK has begun its formal withdrawal from the European Union; in the USA, the advent of President Trump has polarised the American electorate in ways that have not been seen for decades. Elections loom across Europe.

Inevitably, democracy itself is under scrutiny.

 As the background paper suggests, just 21% of Britons trust politicians to tell the truth (Ipsos-Mori 2016). Only a third are satisfied with how Parliament works and think the system by which Britain is governed works well, with those furthest from Westminster most likely to be dissatisfied (Hansard Society 2016 Audit of Political Engagement). Only 13% of people feel they have any influence. On average, 40% of 18-24 year olds voted in the last four general elections, compared to over 60% in 1992. The UK’s youth turnout rate is the lowest in Western Europe, and half that of Sweden, for example.

How do we address such apathy? How might we educate our young people to become active participants in the democratic process? How might we use formal and informal education to help create a democracy that works for as many people as possible?

@StGeorgesHouse @DemocracyM

Sustainable Development Goals

Young People and the Sustainable Development Goals

The seventeen Sustainable Development Goals are hugely important for the future wellbeing of all people, and for the integrity of the biosphere. It is clear that education has a key role to play, not only in helping people understand the significance of the goals, but also in helping to ensure that the goals, and their targets, are achieved.

We already know that a number of schools have programmes focusing on this, but if goal-related learning by students can help increase the likelihood that the goals will be valued, supported and hence realised, is it also the case that a critical study of the goals can enhance the focus, and help raise the quality of student learning? This Consultation will examine these twin propositions. We will look in depth at what good goal-related outcomes might be; and we will explore what more can be done to embed a focus on the SDGs in work with young people both in and out of school.

#sghSDG

@StGeorgesHouse

Competitively Loved? An Ecumenical Christian Consultation on Theological Language used about the Holy Land

In partnership with Churches Together in Britain and Ireland, Christian Aid.

A significant consultation on how, as churches, we use language in the context of our debate and deliberations on the Holy Land, especially with regard to the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

The consultation will address some of the more vexed questions at the heart of our attempts to seek justice for those in the land, including opposition to occupation, and an ongoing commitment to opposing anti-Semitism in our own context, along with developing good interfaith relations with both Jews and Muslims.

The aim is to assist a deeper ecumenical reflection on the conflict which can assist churches in their own debates and decision making both locally and nationally.

#SGHMiddleEast

@CTBI @christian_aid @StGeorgesHouse

Multicolored people holding hands

Senior Faith Leadership Programme

While training for faith leaders is wide-ranging and varied, nowhere in the UK are mid- to senior religious decision makers trained in leadership skills side by side.

The Senior Faith Leadership Programme is intended  to deepen encounters between those who are serving the Abrahamic communities in Britain, whether in a lay or clerical capacity. Its focus is on developing leadership – which by its nature is an inter-disciplinary phenomenon. Leadership of communities affects people from all walks of life and concerns the diversity of human experience.

The 2018 SFLP will span three 3-day residencies, starting in January.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close