Open Science

Open Science: the citizen’s role and contribution to research

The second consultation of four in the Corsham Institute 2017 Thought Leadership Programme in partnership with Rand Europe.

Open Science, as a movement, aims to make scientific research, data and the dissemination of findings more accessible to everyone in society, with citizen science forming one dimension of this
movement, focusing more specifically on the input from members of the public to research activities.

Many citizen science projects involve the public undertaking research and analysing data, with the role of the citizen being to provide additional capacity for the collection and/or review of large volumes of data. These initiatives have been undertaken across multiple disciplines, including ecology, zoology, urban planning, astronomy and physics, arts and humanities, environment and climate, and medicine.

The aim of this event is to consider the future vision for citizen science in a more connected society, and how this vision should evolve. We will also explore the opportunities and challenges that are involved in engaging the public directly in scientific research, and the role which digital technology can play in addressing such issues and further incentivising participation.

#DigitalSociety

@StGeorgesHouse @Corsham_Inst @RANDEurope

character education and citizenship education.

Connecting Character Education and Citizenship Education

The Jubilee Centre for Character & Virtues, in partnership with citizED, will consult a select group about the connections between character education and citizenship education.

As part of its scope of work, the Centre has produced statements on different aspects of character education, including A Framework for Character Education in Schools, a Statement on Youth Social Action and Character Development, and a Statement on Teacher Education and Character Education.

These have been circulated to policymakers, practitioners and academics across the UK, and have been met with widespread support and approval. Given the important interconnections between the two fields, the Consultation will draw together expertise from both academics and professionals in practice to assist us with developing a Statement on Character Education and Citizenship Education.

Malvern 2017- Faith, Belief and Nation-building – What sort of Britain do we want to build for the 21st Century?

In Partnership with University of Worcester, University of Chester, The University of Warwick, William Temple Foundation, Culham St Gabriel’s and Saint Peter’s Saltley Trust

The consultation aims to curate a strategic and deep conversation about nation building and the role of institutional faiths and belief (both religious and non-religious) in that task.

This consultation takes place in the context of a deep sense of fragmentation that was highlighted by the Brexit vote, but which has deeper and longer roots.

It will be taking place approximately a year after the Referendum vote on June 23rd 2016, and this will engage with 12 months of national and international reflection following this momentous event.  Fragmentation is between and within localities as well as regions and nations within the UK as well as running along demographic fault lines such as class and age. A salient parallel to the original Malvern consultation in 1941 is that the stability and security of Europe feels directly under threat – not so much from a global war as from a series of destabilising globalising trends, including terrorism, economic uncertainty and nationalism. The time is ripe to develop a deep and critical sense of multiculturalism about what it means to be British and European in the 21st century. This, we suggest, starts with a shared imaginary of what this means, rooted in religious and philosophical traditions, out of which might emerge a sense of shared narrative of what the United Kingdom is, and the ethics upon which that narrative is based.

Key questions and areas we want to explore at this event include:

  1. What sort of our nation are we?
  2. What sort of nation could we be?
  3. What values and beliefs sustain your vision?

#SGHMalvern2017

@StGeorgesHouse @worcester_uni @warwickuni @uochester
@WTempleFdn @reonline_tweets @Saltley_Trust

BREXIT and Farming

Supporting Farmers Post-Brexit

In March, the Prime Minister will trigger Article 50, formally beginning the UK’s negotiations to leave the European Union. These are uncharted waters but there is little doubt that potentially seismic changes lie ahead.

UK agriculture will face a range of challenges in the years ahead.

 While the government has guaranteed the financial status quo until 2020, the sector needs to look much further ahead. What are the potential threats and opportunities relevant to farmers in the post-Brexit world? How will the transition be managed? What scenarios are likely to emerge and what support needs to be in place to accommodate them? The implications go beyond the purely economic outcome of Brexit.

Astrobiology

Nature and Human Nature: The Digital Media Conversation on Science and Society

The search for biological life in the cosmos has long been a preoccupation of humankind and is now an established multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation under the name of astrobiology. In September 2015, with funding from the NASA Astrobiology Program, the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton (CTI) embarked on a series of cross-disciplinary conversations between the sciences and humanities on the cultural impact of this search on society.

CTI is an independent institution for advanced research on global concerns. It convenes scholars in the humanities and theologians in projects that consider the implications of science, not only for religion but also for society. Astrobiology is at the heart of the discourse.

We live at a time when the existence of life elsewhere seems increasingly likely. Science fiction moves ever closer to becoming science fact. In the United States, NASA continues to be at the forefront of this research and will play a central role in our June conversation.

Inevitably, much of the media response to this area of research is rich in sensationalism but poor in reasoned, cross-disciplinary analysis. Yet all the while scientists and scholars in the humanities and social sciences have been holding a different conversation on science and society, a much more nuanced, thoughtful and creative conversation. It is this conversation that we wish to develop in June and to consider what might be the role of digital media in making this discourse more widely accessible. This will include consideration of the impact of digital media on human nature.

Multicolored people holding hands

Senior Faith Leadership Programme

While training for faith leaders is wide-ranging and varied, nowhere in the UK are mid- to senior religious decision makers trained in leadership skills side by side.

The Senior Faith Leadership Programme is intended  to deepen encounters between those who are serving the Abrahamic communities in Britain, whether in a lay or clerical capacity. Its focus is on developing leadership – which by its nature is an inter-disciplinary phenomenon. Leadership of communities affects people from all walks of life and concerns the diversity of human experience.

The 2017 SFLP will span three 3-day residencies, starting in January.

Applications for the 2017 Leadership Programme are now open. To apply, please visit here

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close