6th June 2018

AI and Religion

In Partnership with The Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence and The Faraday Institute for Science and Religion

The “Trust and Artificial Intelligence” consultation is a follow up from a Seminar Series, ran by Jacopo Domenicucci (Cambridge, Philosophy) and Rune Nyrup (Cambridge, HPS). This consultation is an attempt to set up a conversation across the disciplines on a question of common concern: how do we develop the conditions for appropriate and intelligent forms of trust in the machines, systems and algorithmic procedures that we call “AI”?

Jubilee Centre Logo
25th May 2018

Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues

As part of its scope of work, the Jubilee Centre has produced statements on different aspects of character education, including A Framework for Character Education in Schools, a Statement on Youth Social Action and Character Development, a Statement on Teacher Education and Character Education, and a Statement on Character, Virtue and Practical Wisdom in Professional Practice.

These Statements have been met with widespread support and approval from policymakers, practitioners and academics across the UK and internationally. This consultation opened up a dialogue on the challenges faced in translating the research the Jubilee Centre conducts into accessible and practical solutions for those working on the ground, and discussed how these challenges might be best overcome in new and relevant ways.

13th February 2018

Modern families, modern family justice: supporting family relationships in intact and separated families in fast changing socio-political-economic climates

In partnership with Relate and the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts

Family life continues to change – the impact of political change, economic uncertainty post the Great Recession and continued austerity policies in Europe, as well as the emergence of new opportunities and challenges not least through technology, means that relationship support and family justice services need to change if they are to remain relevant to those in need of these services. 

During a twenty-four hour in-depth Consultation, we examined these challenges, reviewed promising and innovative approaches from across Europe, and, considered what services/organisations and individual practitioners can do to meet a variety of needs. The consultation brought together leading experts in the fields of family relationships and family justice from across Europe to debate current key issues and share knowledge and ideas for the future development of services to support family stability and ensure the best interests of children.

The full report from the consultation can be read here.

post-turth
19th January 2018

Democracy in a Post-Truth Information Age

The year 2016 witnessed the UK vote to leave the European Union and the election of Donald F Trump as President of the United States of America, two seismic events in the history of these democracies.

Both events brought to the fore significant debate regarding the nature and quality of information available to the voting public.

In particular, the Internet and social media were regarded as key emerging battle grounds. The debate honed in on two discrete topics: how information is accessed and shared in an Internet society; and the nature of the information disseminated, especially an increased focus on ‘false’ information. Such was the prevalence of the debate that the Oxford English Dictionary’s word of the year for 2016 was ‘post-truth’.

We looked in depth at the challenges of living in a post-truth information age. Are our democratic processes under threat? Is there a danger of giving free rein to extremism and further destabilising society? Or is this the predictable response of the establishment as alternative viewpoints and information become a greater part of mainstream debate? Either way, society faces significant challenges. What are the responsibilities of citizens, governments, business and the media in this swiftly evolving landscape?

The full report from the Consultation can be read here.

8th December 2017

Competitively Loved? An Ecumenical Christian Consultation on Theological Language used about the Holy Land

In partnership with Churches Together in Britain and Ireland, Christian Aid.

A significant consultation on how, as churches, we use language in the context of our debate and deliberations on the Holy Land, especially with regard to the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

The consultation addressed some of the more vexed questions at the heart of our attempts to seek justice for those in the land, including opposition to occupation, and an ongoing commitment to opposing anti-Semitism in our own context, along with developing good interfaith relations with both Jews and Muslims.

 

Astrobiology
29th June 2017

Nature and Human Nature: The Digital Media Conversation on Science and Society

The search for biological life in the cosmos has long been a preoccupation of humankind and is now an established multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation under the name of astrobiology. In September 2015, with funding from the NASA Astrobiology Program, the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton (CTI) embarked on a series of cross-disciplinary conversations between the sciences and humanities on the cultural impact of this search on society.

CTI is an independent institution for advanced research on global concerns. It convenes scholars in the humanities and theologians in projects that consider the implications of science, not only for religion but also for society. Astrobiology is at the heart of the discourse.

We live at a time when the existence of life elsewhere seems increasingly likely. Science fiction moves ever closer to becoming science fact. In the United States, NASA continues to be at the forefront of this research and will play a central role in our June conversation.

Inevitably, much of the media response to this area of research is rich in sensationalism but poor in reasoned, cross-disciplinary analysis. Yet all the while scientists and scholars in the humanities and social sciences have been holding a different conversation on science and society, a much more nuanced, thoughtful and creative conversation. It is this conversation that we wished to develop in June and considered what might be the role of digital media in making this discourse more widely accessible.

Civic Engagement & Digital Technology
26th June 2017

Civic engagement: How can digital technology encourage greater engagement in Civic Society

The final consultation of four in the Corsham Institute 2017 Thought Leadership Programme in partnership with Rand Europe.

The need for a stronger, more effective understanding of a good citizenship within a connected society was a key theme to emerge from our 2016 Thought Leadership programme. This final event in the 2017 series developed on this theme, and considered how digital technology might be used to strengthen local communities and engage citizens of all ages more generally in our democracy.

With rising disenchantment with main stream political parties, lower voter participation, the rise in support for populist (challenger) political parties, and a general shift in attitudes away from traditional institutions of authority, there is a need to revisit how we can better engage citizens of all ages and backgrounds in civic society, and to support greater participation in our democratic processes at a national as well as local level.

The full Consultation report can be read here. The 2017 Thought Leadership Programme key findings summary can be read here.

2nd June 2017

Malvern 2017- Faith, Belief and Nation-building – What sort of Britain do we want to build for the 21st Century?

In Partnership with University of WorcesterUniversity of ChesterThe University of WarwickWilliam Temple FoundationCulham St Gabriel’sSaint Peter’s Saltley Trust and Centre for Faiths and Public Policy 

This consultation aimed to curate a strategic and deep conversation about nation building and the role of institutional faiths and belief (both religious and non-religious) in that task.

This consultation took place in the context of a deep sense of fragmentation that was highlighted by the Brexit vote, but which has deeper and longer roots.

It took place approximately a year after the Referendum vote on June 23rd 2016, and engaged with 12 months of national and international reflection following this momentous event.  Fragmentation is between and within localities as well as regions and nations within the UK as well as running along demographic fault lines such as class and age. A salient parallel to the original Malvern consultation in 1941 is that the stability and security of Europe feels directly under threat – not so much from a global war as from a series of destabilising globalising trends, including terrorism, economic uncertainty and nationalism. The time is ripe to develop a deep and critical sense of multiculturalism about what it means to be British and European in the 21st century. This, we suggest, starts with a shared imaginary of what this means, rooted in religious and philosophical traditions, out of which might emerge a sense of shared narrative of what the United Kingdom is, and the ethics upon which that narrative is based.

Key questions and areas we wanted to explore at this event included:

  1. What sort of our nation are we?
  2. What sort of nation could we be?
  3. What values and beliefs sustain your vision?

The full consultation report can be read here.

character education and citizenship education.
22nd May 2017

Connecting Character Education and Citizenship

The Jubilee Centre for Character & Virtues, in partnership with citizED, consulted a select group about the connections between character education and citizenship education.

As part of its scope of work, the Centre has produced statements on different aspects of character education, including A Framework for Character Education in Schools, a Statement on Youth Social Action and Character Development, and a Statement on Teacher Education and Character Education.

These have been circulated to policymakers, practitioners and academics across the UK, and have been met with widespread support and approval. Given the important interconnections between the two fields, the Consultation drew together expertise from both academics and professionals in practice to assist us with developing a Statement on Character Education and Citizenship Education.

Currency
5th May 2017

Currency: redefining the way we transact in a digital world

The third consultation of four in the Corsham Institute 2017 Thought Leadership Programme in partnership with Rand Europe.

As new forms of currency become established there will be opportunities, but also strategic challenges and changes in perceptions within society that need to be considered, specifically around issues of trust, integrity, and most importantly economic control and regulation.

This consultation considered the future possibilities for currency in a more digitally connected society, and specifically considered whether crypto-currencies and data will become established as currencies of preference. The discussions also considered the strategic opportunities and challenges that such an emergence will create for society and inclusion.
The full report from the consultation can be read here. The 2017 Thought Leadership Programme key summary report can be read here.