Civic Engagement & Digital Technology
26th June 2017

Civic engagement: How can digital technology encourage greater engagement in Civic Society

The final consultation of four in the Corsham Institute 2017 Thought Leadership Programme in partnership with Rand Europe.

The need for a stronger, more effective understanding of a good citizenship within a connected society was a key theme to emerge from our 2016 Thought Leadership programme. This final event in the 2017 series developed on this theme, and considered how digital technology might be used to strengthen local communities and engage citizens of all ages more generally in our democracy.

With rising disenchantment with main stream political parties, lower voter participation, the rise in support for populist (challenger) political parties, and a general shift in attitudes away from traditional institutions of authority, there is a need to revisit how we can better engage citizens of all ages and backgrounds in civic society, and to support greater participation in our democratic processes at a national as well as local level.

The full Consultation report can be read here. The 2017 Thought Leadership Programme key findings summary can be read here.

Electoral reform society
1st February 2017

Electoral Reform Society

In recent years the Electoral Reform Society has been building relationships across the trade union movement to pursue voting system reform as well as wider changes to our democracy that help to increase people’s participation in politics.

This Consultation aimed to take that work to the next level by bringing key allies together to discuss where next for trade unions, electoral reform and other issues affecting the health of our democracy.

6th September 2016

Civil Society and the State

The Role of Charities in Campaigning

The compact between the state and charity has undergone significant transformation since the Second World War. Today, the operating environment for charities is in considerable regulatory and financial flux. Their role in campaigning is increasingly part of public discourse. How should we define the relationship between civil society and the state in a representative democracy­? 


Our Consultation looked in depth at the issues, bringing together senior people from a range of relevant sectors to spend concentrated time on the topic, away from the glare of the media in the privacy of Windsor Castle.

The summary report can be read here.

Two hands exchanging money
25th June 2015

Corruption, Protest and Militancy

In collaboration with the Justice and Security Research Programme (JSRP) at the London School of Economics, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the World Peace Foundation

 

Current research into corruption is transforming the understanding of the phenomenon. Rather than seeing corruption as the work of individual “bad apples,” guilty of such crimes as bribery, fraud or extortion, analysts are beginning to define it as a functioning system, achieving its core objective with real effectiveness.

Such systems are made up of multi-dimensional political-economic relationships associated with different forms of predatory elite governance—which may differ in form and function in different countries. These developments demand cogent analysis and effective policy responses.

The main question for the consultation was: how does pervasive corruption in government relate to militancy and radicalism in society? Secondary questions included: what forms of corruption tend to be most politically radicalizing? What other risk factors, in conjunction with corruption, help drive extreme responses? What is the role of international assistance and security cooperation in enabling corruption? What is the best combination of policies that can be adopted to mitigate corruption and its adverse political impacts? Should certain countries be prioritised for concerted policy actions? On the basis of what criteria?

A cl;ip art image of hands in the air.
13th October 2014

Changing Politics – Towards a New Democracy

In partnership with Political Studies Association

Over the last 20 years the nature of political engagement in British society has changed dramatically. There is substantial evidence of incrementally growing citizen disenchantment with politics both in terms of behaviour and attitudes. Observational, focus and survey data all point in the same direction.

Reform of politics has been a matter of public discourse for a decade and more. It is an issue of interest and concern to all the political parties although there is little agreement as to how to make such reform work. In fact there is little agreement on what the reforms should be. Our consultation proposed to look in depth at the matter and to work towards practical, forward-looking solutions.

To read the full report click here.

An image of a soldier and poppies.
20th January 2014

World War I Revisited

In partnership with the War Studies Department, King’s College London and The Culture Capital Exchange

World War I had a seismic impact on Western civilisation and, indeed, across the world. Our consultation looked at the social, cultural, political and economic impact of the conflict. Taking a counterfactual approach we asked two related questions concerning the critical events of 1914 – might the war that year have developed differently (as in 1870 or 1940),

and what might our world have looked like had war not broken out at all?

As part of the consultation we used counterfactual techniques to explore possible variations from the historical strategic course of the war in 1914, and the development of the famous trench stalemate.  British, French and German officers engaged in a kriegsspiel of the crucial Western campaigns of August and September to explore whether a more decisive outcome might have occurred as in 1870 and 1940.

The full background paper can be read here.

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